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ABDOMINOPLASTY

Also known as the tummy tuck, abdominoplasty involves surgically tightening loose or separated abdominal muscles following pregnancy and removing excess abdominal skin, which is usually a co-existing problem. Many patients with this condition also have an umbilical hernia (a hernia of the belly button), which causes a bulge in the umbilicus. If present, the hernia is repaired at the same time. The goal of this procedure is to reverse the damaging effects of pregnancy on the tummy and restore it to its pre pregnancy state so that it becomes flatter and smoother.

Occasionally, there may be a significant degree of abdominal skin laxity but without significant damage to the muscles. In this situation, the excess skin is removed without surgically repairing the muscles.

tummy tuck
PROCEDURE
RECOVERY
RISKS AND COMPLICATIONS

An incision is made along the line of a typical C-section scar in the lower abdomen, extending laterally by a variable length according to how much skin needs to be removed. The skin and underlying layer of fat are dissected of the abdominal muscle up to the rib margins. The separated rectus abdominis muscles are carefully repaired in the midline with multiple strong sutures. If an umbilical hernia is present, it is repaired concurrently. Bleeding is meticulously controlled.

Excess skin is then removed. If the amount of excess skin to be removed reaches the level of the umbilicus or above, the umbilicus is first preserved by making an incisions around its margins and deepening these incisions so that the umbilical stalk is effectively preserved. The excess skin is then removed, and the upper skin flap is pulled downwards to meet the lower skin flap for wound closure. An opening is then created in the midline of the upper skin flap exactly where the previously preserved umbilical stalk is located, and the umbilicus is then brought out through this opening and sutured to it margins. The wounds are accurately closed after inserting one or two surgical drains.

The procedure takes three to four hours under general anesthesia and is completed as an inpatient procedure in hospital.

If there is only loose and excess skin without muscle separation, then muscle repair is not required and only the excess skin needs to be removed. In this case, the operation is completed as a two hour day surgery procedure without the need for hospitalization.